Sharing Criminal Stories

12 ON YOUR SIDE ALERT: Scam FBI Calls

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) -

It's a call that would scare just about anyone -- a call from the FBI. The only problem, the call is not coming from them but from crooks. It's happening in the Richmond area. Criminals are using the FBI's good name in hopes you will give up some money.

A Richmond woman recently got one of these scam phone calls. She didn't want to talk on camera but sent us an email detailing the call. The claim, she was in big trouble and needed to pay an advance fee so she wouldn't end up in jail. We took her concern to FBI Special Agent Alasdair Mackenzie.

"What saddens me is the number of people that are continuously victimized by these scams," he told us. Agent Mackenzie says the FBI will never call threatening an arrest, asking for money or requesting your personal information. He says when it comes to these phone scams there are two types of people that answer. "You've got people who realize at the beginning of phone call or letter that hey, this is a scam, they don't respond to it and they contact law enforcement," he says.

Our would-be victims falls into this category but there are those who get duped. "We've seen people who lose hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars through these scams," he says. In rare cases, you may get a call from the FBI but even if you think the call is legit, ask for the agency's number, hang up, research the number to make sure it's accurate and then call back to verify the call. "Once they have realized they have gotten someone who is vulnerable to being victimized, they are going to continue to victimize that person as much as they can, until the person refuses to cooperate anymore," he says.

The viewer who called us says the FBI impersonator had her date of birth and Social Security number. The FBI warns don't be fooled by this, crooks find ways to get their hands on this private information.

Websites like FBI.GOV and the Internet Crime Complaint Center are great resources for staying on top of the latest scams and reporting them. Special Agent Mackenzie says if you report it, officers will investigate.

He admits catching the criminals can be quite the task. "Depending on where the individual may be from, depending on if he is out side of the Continental United States, it certainly makes it a little bit more challenging but it doesn't mean that is impossible," he says. Remember, if you get one of these FBI imposter calls, hanging up is also a good line of defense.

Copyright 2012 WWBT NBC12. All rights reserved.

Read More @ Source



Murderous Stories Here

Spanish ETA terror suspects arrested in London

Three ETA militants pose in front of the group's symbol of a snake coiled around an axe, in an undated file photo.
Three ETA militants pose in front of the group's symbol of a snake coiled around an axe, in an undated file photo.
  • NEW: Antonio Troitino Arranz's arrest deals a blow to ETA, the Spanish Interior Ministry says
  • Troitino was responsible for more than 20 murders in terror attacks, it says
  • No weapons have been found in a search of two west London properties, police say

London (CNN) -- Two members of the Basque separatist movement ETA, including one who has been convicted of more than 20 murders, were arrested Friday in London over alleged terror offenses, the Spanish Interior Ministry said.

The men were detained at a west London home by officers from the Metropolitan Police's Counter Terrorism Command.

The Spanish Interior Ministry named them as Antonio Troitino Arranz, 55, and Ignatio Lerin Sanchez, 39.

Troitino has been part of the Basque separatist movement ETA since the 1980s and was involved in many terrorist attacks, the ministry said.

One of the worst was the bombing of a police bus in Madrid that left 12 officers dead and injured 51 people, including civilians, it said. Troitino was the one who triggered the bomb, the ministry said.

2011: Hope, skepticism of cessation

Troitino is wanted under a European arrest warrant issued in April last year "for belonging to an armed group or terrorist organization," it said.

According to Spanish media reports, Troitino was let out of jail due to what is described as a judicial error, and fled before it could be corrected and he could be detained again.

Ignacio Lerin, who has been on the run since 2007, when his brother was arrested as an ETA member, is wanted on suspicion of belonging to an armed group and possession of explosives, it said.

The arrests have dealt a blow to ETA, the ministry said, as Troitino has direct links to the group's present leadership.

In London, officers continue to search the house in Hounslow where the two were arrested before dawn, a Metropolitan Police statement said. A search of a second home has been completed. No weapons have been found, the statement said.

The two suspected ETA members, whose arrests were made under extradition law, are being held at a central London police station.

A 38-year-old woman also was arrested at the same house as the two Spaniards. She is accused of fraud and remains in police custody, the police statement said.

Two other men at the same address were arrested for alleged immigration offenses.

Spanish security forces have arrested 16 members of ETA since January, including three in the past week, the Interior Ministry said.

Listed as a terrorist organization by Spain, the United States and the European Union, ETA is blamed for more than 800 deaths in its decades-long fight for an independent Basque state that it wants carved out of sections of northern Spain and southwestern France.

Last year, ETA announced "a definitive cessation of its armed activity," raising hopes that decades of separatist violence may finally be over.

Spain's conservative government has stepped up arrests since winning elections in November. The Popular Party of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has long maintained a tough line against ETA.

CNN's Alexander Felton and Al Goodman contributed to this report.

Read More @ Source



Murderous Stories Here

FBI's Ten Most Wanted list — its past and present

WASHINGTON — The idea came out of a card game. A reporter playing Hearts with Crime Director J. Edgar Hoover asked him to name the meanest, wiliest fugitives the bureau could not track down. He thought putting their pictures in the newspaper might help.

It was 1949 and Hoover long had insisted no one could outsmart his Crime, not for long anyway. But a few weeks later, 10 names and pictures appeared at the reporter's door, and he got them plastered on the front of the Washington Daily News.

They were a sorry lot. Four escapees, three con men, two accused murderers and a bank robber. They were plucked from 5,700 fugitives hiding in the U.S. or abroad. To Hoover's surprise, nine of the 10 were soon captured. A year later, the Crime's Ten Most Wanted list was officially born.

Since then, 497 fugitives have made the roster. Their photos and IDs have gone from newspaper pages to TV screens, from post office posters to iPhone apps. Some names remain etched in the nation's psyche, including Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassin, James Earl Ray; serial killer Ted Bundy; and Al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden.

In recent months, new details about some of the cases have come to light as about 250 former Crime agents have told their stories in oral histories that will be housed at the National Law Enforcement Museum when it opens next year in Washington.

"There are some big names, and some unsung heroes in here," said Susan Walton Wynkoop, a former agent helping spearhead the project.

John Fox, the Crime's in-house historian, said the list reflects the changing phenomenon of crime in America. The 1950s: bank robbers, prison escapees and car thieves. The '60s and '70s: anti-war radicals and organized crime figures. The '80s and '90s: drug traffickers and sexual predators. The current era: international terrorism.

"You have to be someone … who is missing, escaped from prison, disappeared after you were indicted," Fox said. "You have to vanish."

Candidat! es for t he list are nominated by the 56 Crime field offices. Who is most dangerous? Who is likely to be found? Will national exposure help find them? At headquarters in Washington, the Criminal Investigative Division reviews the candidates and senior managers make the final call.

Slots open up when a suspect is captured or dies, or when charges are dropped. Some are caught within hours; some take decades. Two were fingered after visitors touring Crime headquarters recognized their pictures.

About 94% of those on the list have been arrested, a third of them after tips from the public. "We certainly think it's been effective," Fox said.

First on the official Crime list was Thomas James Holden. On June 5, 1949, he killed his wife and her two brothers in their fourth-floor apartment in Chicago. He left the .38 revolver, four spent cartridges and two loaded shells on the dresser.

Agents tracked him to Cedar Lake, Ind., but the trail went cold. Yet as the list circulated, a reader of the Oregonian newspaper in Portland spotted a black-and-white photo on Page 7.

The paper said the fugitive was "a menace to every man, woman and child in America." But the reader recognized the man in the photo as John McCullough, with whom he worked as a plasterer. The next day agents appeared at the job site and arrested Holden.

Glen Roy Wright, No. 8 on the original list, was a prison escapee out of Oklahoma; he had persuaded the guards to let him visit his supposedly ailing mother. After a string of robberies, he relocated to Salina, Kan., and patrons at a local drug store wondered about the stranger in town. The next time Wright stopped in, the Crime was waiting.

Those early captures thrilled the country and enthused the Crime. They kept the list rolling.

James "Whitey" Bulger Jr., wanted for mob killings in Boston, was the oldest fugitive — 69 when he was added in 1999. He was 81 when the Crime caught him last year near his Santa Monica apartment.

Victor Manuel Gerena, who alle! gedly ha ndcuffed two of his colleagues and made off with $ 7 million in their Wells Fargo armored car, has been missing the longest — 28 years. Best guess? Hiding in Cuba.

"He still is a Top Ten fugitive," lamented retired Agent William E. Dyson. All they know for sure, Dyson said, is the $ 7 million showed up in Puerto Rico.

Read More @ Source

Criminal Minds - 5x07 The Performer (Full Episode)

The BAU team follows a trail of murders that seems to align with the tour schedule of a rock star. Gavin Rossdale plays a Goth performer who has become lost in the frightening alter-ego he portrays on stage - an alter-ego the BAU team suspects may be a brutal serial killer. *I do not own this material, nor do I claim to. It rightly belongs to CBS and I gain no profit from this in ANY way.

Video Rating: 4 / 5



Murderous Stories Here

FBI's Ten Most Wanted list — its past and present

WASHINGTON — The idea came out of a card game. A reporter playing Hearts with FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover asked him to name the meanest, wiliest fugitives the bureau could not track down. He thought putting their pictures in the newspaper might help.

It was 1949 and Hoover long had insisted no one could outsmart his FBI, not for long anyway. But a few weeks later, 10 names and pictures appeared at the reporter's door, and he got them plastered on the front of the Washington Daily News.

They were a sorry lot. Four escapees, three con men, two accused murderers and a bank robber. They were plucked from 5,700 fugitives hiding in the U.S. or abroad. To Hoover's surprise, nine of the 10 were soon captured. A year later, the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list was officially born.

Since then, 497 fugitives have made the roster. Their photos and IDs have gone from newspaper pages to TV screens, from post office posters to iPhone apps. Some names remain etched in the nation's psyche, including Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassin, James Earl Ray; serial killer Ted Bundy; and Al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden.

In recent months, new details about some of the cases have come to light as about 250 former FBI agents have told their stories in oral histories that will be housed at the National Law Enforcement Museum when it opens next year in Washington.

"There are some big names, and some unsung heroes in here," said Susan Walton Wynkoop, a former agent helping spearhead the project.

John Fox, the FBI's in-house historian, said the list reflects the changing phenomenon of crime in America. The 1950s: bank robbers, prison escapees and car thieves. The '60s and '70s: anti-war radicals and organized crime figures. The '80s and '90s: drug traffickers and sexual predators. The current era: international terrorism.

"You have to be someone … who is missing, escaped from prison, disappeared after you were indicted," Fox said. "You have to vanish."

Candidates for the! list ar e nominated by the 56 FBI field offices. Who is most dangerous? Who is likely to be found? Will national exposure help find them? At headquarters in Washington, the Criminal Investigative Division reviews the candidates and senior managers make the final call.

Slots open up when a suspect is captured or dies, or when charges are dropped. Some are caught within hours; some take decades. Two were fingered after visitors touring FBI headquarters recognized their pictures.

About 94% of those on the list have been arrested, a third of them after tips from the public. "We certainly think it's been effective," Fox said.

First on the official FBI list was Thomas James Holden. On June 5, 1949, he killed his wife and her two brothers in their fourth-floor apartment in Chicago. He left the .38 revolver, four spent cartridges and two loaded shells on the dresser.

Agents tracked him to Cedar Lake, Ind., but the trail went cold. Yet as the list circulated, a reader of the Oregonian newspaper in Portland spotted a black-and-white photo on Page 7.

The paper said the fugitive was "a menace to every man, woman and child in America." But the reader recognized the man in the photo as John McCullough, with whom he worked as a plasterer. The next day agents appeared at the job site and arrested Holden.

Glen Roy Wright, No. 8 on the original list, was a prison escapee out of Oklahoma; he had persuaded the guards to let him visit his supposedly ailing mother. After a string of robberies, he relocated to Salina, Kan., and patrons at a local drug store wondered about the stranger in town. The next time Wright stopped in, the FBI was waiting.

Those early captures thrilled the country and enthused the FBI. They kept the list rolling.

James "Whitey" Bulger Jr., wanted for mob killings in Boston, was the oldest fugitive — 69 when he was added in 1999. He was 81 when the FBI caught him last year near his Santa Monica apartment.

Victor Manuel Gerena, who allegedly handcuffed two o! f his co lleagues and made off with $ 7 million in their Wells Fargo armored car, has been missing the longest — 28 years. Best guess? Hiding in Cuba.

"He still is a Top Ten fugitive," lamented retired Agent William E. Dyson. All they know for sure, Dyson said, is the $ 7 million showed up in Puerto Rico.

Read More @ Source



Murderous Stories Here
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...